Tuesday, February 18, 2014

World's Tallest Family

The Kulkarni family has been featured in Limca Book of Records since the inception as the tallest couple with a combined height of 4.09 m. They are now hoping to set a new world record with their combined height. Sharad Kulkarni, 52, stands at 7ft 1.5-inch tall and his wife Sanjot, 46, is 6ft 2.6-inches tall. Their daughters, 22-year-old Mruga and 16-year-old Sanya, are 6ft 1inch and 6ft 4inches respectively. The four-member family's combined height is a staggering 26ft.

The couple married in December 1988. A year later Limca Book of Records pronounced them India’s tallest married couple. They had hoped to be named the world's tallest couple by the Guinness Book of Records, until it emerged that Wayne and Laurie Hallquist, from Stockton, California, stand a combined inch taller at 13ft 4 inches. Guinness Book of Records does not currently have a tallest family category but would consider it.

The Kulkarnis have wardrobes full of custom-made clothes and shoes. Their house has been adapted to meet their needs - they had to change all the door frames from 6ft to 8ft high. They have customized their furniture including beds, wardrobes, kitchen shelves, and even the height of the toilet.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

The Grand Dragon Hotel - World's Highest Hotel

Hotel The Grand Dragon Ladakh, the only Star Luxury hotel in Ladakh, Jammu & Kashmir is the world’s highest hotel. It is situated at 11300 ft. The hotel is owned and operated by Abdu family from Leh. Mr. Din Mohammed spearheads the business and, is ably assisted by his two sons, Gulam Mustafa and Ghulam Mohiuddin.  The hotel showcases the traditional and ethnic architectural values of the region with a view to boost tourist inflow. It is fully equipped with modern facilities like heating system, running hot water and cold water systems even in extreme weather conditions. Today Grand Dragon is visited by dignitaries, diplomats, VVIPs and celebrities throughout the year.

                                                                                 
                                                                                                     I don't claim the information to be my own. It has been collected from various sources

Saturday, October 5, 2013

Indra Sabha - Movie having most no. of Songs

Movie Indra Sabha released in 1932,  the very next year after Alam Ara (first Indian talkie), holds the world record for having most no. of songs in any musical ever made. It featured 71 songs. The singers were Master Nissar and Kajjan. The movie was based on a play was released by Madan Theatre in 1932.

                                                                                  I don't claim the information to be my own. It has been collected from various sources

Friday, September 6, 2013

Hero Cycles - World's No. 1 Cycle Manufacturer


Hero Cycles Limited, based in Ludhiana Punjab, India, is a manufacturer of bicycles and bicycle related products. Hero Cycles Ltd (HCL), established in 1956, became the largest bicycle manufacturer in the country in 1975. The Hero Group company went on to become the world’s No 1 in 1986.
The four Munjal brothers, namely, Satyanand Munjal, Om Prakash Munjal. Late Dayanand Munjal and Late Raman Kant Munjal , hailed from a small town called Kamalia, now in Pakistan, established the Hero group. The brothers first established a business of bicycle spare parts in the year 1944 in Amritsar. After partition and independence of India, the brothers moved to Ludhiana and started a bicycle unit called Hero Cycles in 1956. From a modest beginning of mere 639 bicycles in the year 1956, Hero Cycles products over 18500 cycles a day today, the highest in global reckoning.
With the 48% share of the Indian market, this volume has catapulted Hero in the ‘Guinness Books of World Records’ in 1986 and edge over global players is being maintained since then. The company has already put over 13.5 crore bicycles on road.
Hero Group Management style has been acclaimed internationally by World Bank and BBC, UK. Hero Group is discussed as a case study at London Business School, UK and INSEAD, France. World Bank has acclaimed Hero Cycles as a role model in vendor development based on a world-wide study. The London Business School, UK, has done a case study on the Group as model of entrepreneurship.
It is indeed “Hero of the World”. 

                                                                                                I don't claim the information to be my own. It has been collected from various sources

Sunday, August 18, 2013

Kashmiri Saffron - World's Costliest Spice

Saffron is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the saffron crocus and is considered to be the most expensive spice of the world.
Saffron has been cultivated for more than 3,000 years for its unique flavor and strong coloring power. The expensive spice can have a bright orange-yellow color with a distinct scent, and is sold in either powder form, but deep red filaments are preferable to avoid adulteration. More than 150 volatile and aroma-yielding compounds are in Saffron, which has been used as a medicine and aphrodisiac in previous times. It is also used as aromatic in baths, perfumes and dyes.
It's not the flavor nor any health benefits associated with the reddish-yellow spice, which has made it the most expensive spice in the world.  Rather, its the cultivation process.
It has been estimated that approximately one acre of purple crocuses, the flower from which saffron threads are harvested, will yield only one pound of saffron. This is because each crocus flower only produces 3 threads of saffron. About 14,000 threads (actually the dried stigmas of the crocus flower) equals one ounce of saffron, so that should give you an idea of the labor intensive process that goes into harvesting saffron threads.
Saffron is produced in countries such as Greece, Spain, Turkey, Iran, India and Morocco, and then sold in different grades by color, taste and fragrance.
Kashmir is considered one of the three prominent cultivating places of saffron all over the world. Kashmiri saffron is seen as the legend of the saffron species where it has been grown in the fields of Pampore near Srinagar for close to 2500 years. Kashmiri saffron is recognisable by its dark maroon-purple hue; it is among the world's darkest, which hints at strong flavour, aroma, and colourative effect. There are three grades of saffron available in Indian market and they are known as Saffron Lachha, saffron Mongra and saffron Zarda. While Iran accounts for about 70% of total world production, the quality of the Kashmiri saffron is considered the best and the finest.
 I don't claim the information to be my own. It has been collected from various sources

Sunday, August 11, 2013

National Symbols of India

The Republic of India has several official national symbols including a flag, an emblem, an anthem, a calendar as well as several other symbols. All the symbols were picked up at various times. The design of the national flag was adopted by the Constituent Assembly just before independence, on July 22, 1947. There are also several other symbols including the national animal, bird, flower and tree.
These symbols are intrinsic to the Indian identity and heritage. Indians of all demographics backgrounds across the world are proud of these National Symbols as they infuse a sense of pride and patriotism in every Indian's heart.
National Flag - 
The National Flag is a horizontal tricolour of deep saffron (kesaria) at the top, white in the middle and dark green at the bottom in equal proportion. The ratio of width of the flag to its length is two to three. In the centre of the white band is a navy-blue wheel which repre sents the chakra.
The top saffron color, indicates the strength and courage of the country. The white middle band indicates peace and truth with Dharma Chakra. The green shows the fertility, growth and auspiciousness of the land.
Its design is that of the wheel which appears on the abacus of the Sarnath Lion Capital of Ashoka. Its diameter approximates to the width of the white band and it has 24 spokes. The design of the National Flag was adopted by the Constituent Assembly of India on 22 July 1947, when it became the official flag of the Dominion of India.  It served as the national flag of the Dominion of India between 15 August 1947 and 26 January 1950, and has served as the flag of the Republic of India since then

Also read - Evolution of India's National Flag

National Anthem - 
Jana Gana Mana is the national anthem of India. Written in Bengali, it is the first of five stanzas of a Brahmo hymn composed and scored by Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore. It was first sung in Calcutta Session of the Indian National Congress on 27 December 1911. "Jana Gana Mana" was officially adopted by the Constituent Assembly as the Indian national anthem on 24 January 1950. 27 December 2011 marked the completion of 100 years of Jana Gana Mana since it was sung for the first time.
The original poem written by Rabindranath Tagore was translated into Hindi by Abid Ali. The original Hindi version of the song Jana Gana Mana, translated by Ali and based on the poem by Tagore, was a little different. It was "Sukh Chain Ki Barkha Barase, Bharat Bhagya Hai Jaga....".
A formal rendition of the national anthem takes fifty-two seconds. A shortened version consisting of the first and last lines (and taking about 20 seconds to play) is also staged occasionally.
National Song - 

The song Vande Mataram, composed in Sanskrit by Bankimchandra Chatterji, was a source of inspiration to the people in their struggle for freedom. It has an equal status with Jana-gana-mana. On January 24, 1950, the President, Dr. Rajendra Prasad came up with a statement in the Constituent Assembly, "the song Vande Mataram, which has played a historic part in the struggle for Indian freedom, shall be honoured equally with Jana Gana Mana and shall have equal status with it."
The first political occasion when it was sung was the 1896 session of the Indian National Congress. The song was a part of Bankimchandra's most famous novel Anand Math (1882).

State Emblem - 
The emblem of India is an adaptation of the Sarnath Lion Capital of Ashoka.It was adopted as the National Emblem of India on 26 January 1950, the day that India became a republic. The emblem forms a part of the official letterhead of the Government of India, and appears on all Indian currency as well. It also sometimes functions as the national emblem of India in many places and appears prominently on the diplomatic and national Passport of the Republic of India. The wheel "Ashoka Chakra" from its base has been placed onto the center of the National Flag of India.
The state emblem is an adaptation from the Sarnath Lion Capital of Ashoka. In the original, there are four lions, standing back to back, mounted on an abacus with a frieze carrying sculptures in high relief of an elephant, a galloping horse, a bull and a lion separated by intervening wheels over a bell-shaped lotus. Carved out of a single block of polished sandstone, the Capital is crowned by the Wheel of the Law (Dharma Chakra).
National Motto -
Satyameva Jayate is a Hindu mantra from the ancient scripture Mundaka Upanishad. Upon independence of India, it was adopted as the national motto of India. It is inscribed in Devanagari script at the base of the national emblem. The emblem and words 'Satyameva Jayate' are inscribed on one side of all Indian currency. The emblem is an adaptation of the Lion Capital of Asoka which was erected around 250 BCE at Sarnath, near Varanasi in the north Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, but does not contain the motto. The origin of the motto is a well-known mantra 3.1.6 from the Mundaka UpanishadThe mantra is as follows:
In Devanāgarī:
सत्यमेव जयते नानृतं
सत्येन पन्था विततो देवयानः |येनाक्रमन्त्यृषयो ह्याप्तकामा
यत्र तत् सत्यस्य परमं निधानम् ||||
In English:
Truth alone triumphs; not falsehood.
Through truth the divine path is spread out
by which the sages whose desires have been completely fulfilled, reach
where that supreme treasure of Truth resides
Indian national calendar - 
The Indian national calendar (sometimes called Saka calendar) is the official civil calendar in use in India. It is used, alongside the Gregorian calendar, by The Gazette of India, news broadcasts by All India Radio, and calendars and communications issued by the Government of India. The term may also ambiguously refer to the Hindu calendar, and the Saka era is commonly used by different calendars as well.
The calendar was introduced by the Calendar Reform Committee in 1957, as part of the Indian Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac, which also contained other astronomical data, as well as timings and formulae for preparing Hindu religious calendars, in an attempt to harmonise this practice. Despite this effort, local variations based on older sources such as the Surya Siddhanta may still exist. Usage officially started at Chaitra 1, 1879 Saka Era, or March 22, 1957. 
Calendar Structure
Month (Sanskrit)
Length
Start date (Gregorian)
Tropical Zodiac
1
Chaitra
30/31
March 22*
Aries
2
Vaishākha
31
April 21
Taurus
3
Jyaishtha
31
May 22
Gemini
4
Āshādha
31
June 22
Cancer
5
Shrāvana
31
July 23
Leo
6
Bhādrapada
31
August 23
Virgo
7
Āshwin
30
September 23
Libra
8
Kārtika
30
October 23
Scorpio
9
Agrahayana
30
November 22
Sagitarius
10
Pausha
30
December 22
Capricorn
11
Māgha
30
January 21
Aquarius
12
Phālguna
30
February 20
Pisces

National Language –
Neither the Constitution of India nor Indian law specifies a National language. India specifies Hindi and English as official languages of the India de jure. Article 343 of the constitution specifies that the official language of the India is Hindi in Devanagari script. Article 354 states that a state of India may officially adopt one or more languages in use in the state or Hindi/English as the language or languages to be used for all or any of the official purposes of that state. Section 8 of The Official Languages Act of 1963 (as amended in 1967) empowers the Union Government to make rules regarding the languages which may be used for the Official purposes of the Union, for transaction of business in Parliament, and for communication between the Union Government and the states. Section 3 of G.S.R. 1053, titled "Rules, 1976 (As Amended, 1987)" specifies that communications from a Central (Union) Government office to a State or a Union Territory in shall, save in exceptional cases (Region "A") or shall ordinarily (Region "B"), be in Hindi, and if any communication is issued to any of them in English it shall be accompanied by a Hindi translation thereof. Section 3 of G.S.R. 1053, titled "Rules, 1976 states Communications from a Central Government office to State or Union Territory in Region "C" or to any office (not being a Central Government office) or person in such State shall be in English. Region C (South India) covers Tamil Nadu, Kerala , Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh.
National Flower - 
Lotus (Nelumbo Nucipera Gaertn) is the National Flower of India. It is a sacred flower and occupies a unique position in the art and mythology of ancient India and has been an auspicious symbol of Indian culture since time immemorial.
India is rich in flora. Currently available data place India in the tenth position in the world and fourth in Asia in plant diversity. From about 70 per cent geographical area surveyed so far, 47,000 species of plants have been described by the Botanical Survey of India (BSI).
National Fruit - 
Mango is the national fruit of India, Philippines and Pakistan. It finds mention in the songs of 4th century CE Sanskrit poet, Kalidasa, prior to it is believed to have been tasted by Alexander (3rd century BCE) and Chinese pilgrim, Hieun Tsang (7th century CE). Later in 16th century Mughal Emperor, Akbar planted 100,000 mango trees in Darbhanga, Bihar at a place now known as Lakhi Bagh  In Hinduism, the perfectly ripe mango is often held by Lord Ganesha as a symbol of attainment, regarding the devotees potential perfection. Mango blossoms are also used in the worship of the goddess Saraswati. Mango leaves are used to decorate archways and doors in Indian houses and during weddings and celebrations like Ganesh Chaturthi. In Tamil Nadu, Mango is considered, along with Banana and jack fruit, as the Three royal fruits (Mukkani).
National Bird - 
The Indian peacock, Pavo cristatus, the National Bird of India, is a colourful, swan-sized bird, with a fan-shaped crest of feathers, a white patch under the eye and a long, slender neck. The male of the species is more colourful than the female, with a glistening blue breast and neck and a spectacular bronze-green tail of around 200 elongated feathers. The female is brownish, slightly smaller than the male and lacks the tail. The elaborate courtship dance of the male, fanning out the tail and preening its feathers is a gorgeous sight.

Peacock has been used in numerous iconic representations, including being designated the national bird of India in 1963. The peacock, known as Mayura in Sanskrit, has enjoyed a fabled place in India since and is frequently depicted in temple art, mythology, poetry, folk-music and traditions. Many Hindu deities are associated with the bird, Krishna is often depicted with a feather in his headband, while worshippers of Shiva associate the bird as the steed of the God of war, Karthikeya (also known as Skanda or Murugan). In Buddhist philosophy, the peacock represents wisdom. Peacock feathers are used in many rituals and ornamentation. Peacock motifs are widespread in Indian temple architecture, old coinage, textiles and continue to be used in many modern items of art and utility
National Animal - 
The magnificent tiger, Panthera tigris is a striped animal. It has a thick yellow coat of fur with dark stripes. The combination of grace, strength, agility and enormous power has earned the tiger its pride of place as the national animal of India. Out of eight races of the species known, the Indian race, the Royal Bengal Tiger, is found throughout the country except in the north-western region and also in the neighboring countries, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. To check the dwindling population of tigers in India, 'Project Tiger' was launched in April 1973. So far, 27 tiger reserves have been established in the country under this project, covering an area of 37,761 sq km.
The Bengal tiger has been a national symbol of India since about the 25th century BCE when it was displayed on the Pashupati seal of the Indus Valley Civilisation. On the seal, the tiger, being the largest, represents the Yogi Shiva's people.
National Aquatic Animal - 
Ganges River Dolphin is the National Aquatic Animal of India. This animal was given this title as it represents the purity of the Ganges as this mammal only survives in pure and fresh water. They are locally known as susu, due to the sound which is made while breathing. It is critically endangered in India and has been included in the Schedule I for the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. The main reasons for the decrease in its population are poaching and habitat degradation and construction of barrages resulting in physical barrier for this species.
National Heritage Animal - 
Asian elephant is the National Heritage Animal of India. This status was given to this animal due to the decline in its polulation. The Environment and Forest Ministry recommended to give this title to this species and the Elephant Task Force was approved by the standing committee of National Board of Wildlife on October 13 2010. There are over 25,000 elephants in the country, including 3,500 in zoos and temples-- specially in Kerala and north-eastern parts of India.
National River - 
In November 2008, the Ganges, alone among India's rivers, was declared a "National River", facilitating the formation of a Ganga River Basin Authority that would have greater powers to plan, implement and monitor measures aimed at protecting the river.
The Ganges or Ganga, is a trans-boundary river of India and Bangladesh. The river rises in the western Himalayas in the Indian state of Uttarakhand, and flows south and east through the Gangetic Plain of North India into Bangladesh, where it empties into the Bay of Bengal. By discharge it ranks among the world's top 20 rivers. The Ganges is the most sacred river to Hindus and is also a lifeline to millions of Indians who live along its course and depend on it for their daily needs. It is worshiped as the goddess Ganga in Hinduism
National Game - 
Hockey is the national sport of India. The Indian men's hockey team is the most successful hockey team in Olympic history with 8 gold, 1 silver, and 2 bronze medals. Indian hockey's golden era was from 1928-1956, when the Indian hockey team successively won six Olympic gold medals.
National Tree - 
Banyan, or Ficus benghalensis, is the national tree of India. Ficus benghalensis produces propagating roots which grow downwards as aerial roots. Once these roots reach the ground, they grow into woody trunks that can become indistinguishable from the main trunk. This tree is considered sacred in India, and often shelters a little or larger temple underneath. Even today, most village council meets under this tree.
National Currency Symbol - 
The symbol of Indian Rupee signifies India's international identity for money transactions and economic strength. The Indian Rupee sign is an allegory of Indian ethos. The symbol is an amalgam of Devanagari "Ra" and the Roman Capital "R" with two parallel horizontal stripes running at the top representing the national flag and also the "equal to" sign. The Indian Rupee sign was adopted by the Government of India on 15th July, 2010.
The symbol, conceptualised and designed by Udaya Kumar, a post graduate in Design from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, has been chosen from thousands of concept entries received by the Ministry of Finance through an open competition among resident Indian nationals. The process of establishing and implementing this new identity is underway through various digital technology and computer applications


 I don't claim the information to be my own. It has been collected from various sources 
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